Cinnamon, Spice & Everything Nice This Holiday Season

November 8, 2017 Leave your thoughts

Bringing Comfort & Joy

‘Tis the season to add some spice in your life. The weather is cooler, stress management is in full gear and some tummy nurturing is much needed (or will be needed). Who can you call to be your “stress extinguisher”? Cinnamon!  I call cinnamon essential oil, a “hug in a bottle”.  It brings comfort, stability, feelings of safety and security, warms the heart and provokes self love. The holidays are a time to celebrate, but for some, it can be a lonely, sad and stressful time. Time to spice up your life, or help spice up someone else’s.

Cinnamon for Stress Management

Cinnamon essential oil, Cinnamomum zylancium, offers a spicy, semi-sweet, sharp and clove-like scent. It is a high middle to low base note, meaning it can hold its own weight in a blend, but can be overpowering when mixed with low top notes like bergamot and grapefruit. Historically, it has been noted as the oldest spice known to man. Egyptians used during the embalming process. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, it is a popular medicine remedy for many ailments. It is contraindicated with those taking blood thinners as it has natural blood thinning properties. Do not use undiluted internally as it can irritate internal membranes and linings.

This evergreen tree can grow up to 40 feet tall. The bark is harvested by peeling it back, exposing the inner layers and letting it dry out in the sun. Cinnamon is most beneficial for the immune, intestinal, circulatory, nervous and glandular systems. As you can image, there is many interdependencies and overlapping of body processes within these systems. A powerful antiviral remedy, it is also antibacterial, anti-parasitic, antispasmodic, carminative and stomachic. Physically, I like to use cinnamon for circulation of tired and fatigues legs, blood sugar balance, sore muscles and silent reflux. Emotionally, it can help during times of sadness, loneliness, bereavement, emotional coldness and panic attacks. Mentally, it can help combat sleepiness, fatigue, jet lag, mood swings and stress.

Supporting Spices

Anise, Pimpinella anisum, has a licorice scent with sweet, hearty and herbal undertones. Aniseed, as it is commonly referred to, aids in digestion, congestion in the body (respiratory, intestinal, circulation, liver) and antispasmodic. You can add the spice to food dishes and herbal teas, or diffuse throughout the house.  I like to add in a citrus oil with another spice and maybe an herbal scent, like lemongrass or thyme, to blend it together, and calm the powerful licorice scent. It combines well with others, however, it can overtake a blend. Thus, only a drop or two is needed. I like this aroma to help with adrenal fatigue, energy, cold in the extremities and add some digestive “fire” to calm silent reflux and IBS issues.

Clove, Eugenia caryophyllata, has a spicy, drying and stimulating scent. Clove, lemon and thyme were used during WWII to disinfect hospitals, showing it powerful antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. Mentally, clove can help someone work through addictions, panic attacks and negative thoughts. Emotionally, it is known to cleanse your aura, help you connect to your self-awareness and protect your personal space from unwanted invasions. Physically, I’ve added it to anti-arthritic blends, as a toothache analgesic and sciatica (nerve) pain. It is a middle note and can balance out top and base notes, bringing a spicy flare between air and earth.

Ginger, Zingiber officinale, is one of the most popular spices, behind cinnamon. Much research has been conducted on ginger demonstrating its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic and analgesic properties. I like it to calm digestive, intestinal, muscular and immune distress. Ginger is an underground rhizome that likes moisture in a well drained soil environment. Thus, the ginger personality is “spicy”, adding life to a party (especially when combined with peppermint), however, they like with room to breathe. They require much hydration to avoid imbalances, and does well when they are in the warm sun.

Nutmeg, Myristica fragrans, has a spicy scent with warm, herbaceous and camphoraceous undertones. The plant does not like cold weather, hence, if you follow the law of plant signatures, this indicates it would be good for a person who does not like the cold. Nutmeg, is a wonderful remedy for digestive and intestinal issues, as well as nourishing to the nervous system and strengthening to the structural system (hair, skin, nails, bones, muscles). I like this one especially for emotions of abandonment, loneliness, cold-hearted or hardened heart, grief and sorrow.  These are emotions that are common around the holidays, one reason spice oils are a favorite. I like to diffuse nutmeg with other spices, orange and/or bergamot, roman chamomile, bay laurel and jasmine to inspire “holiday comfort” and as a reminder that everything will be ok.

SPICE OF LIFE ROOM MIST

2oz. distilled water or liquid plant enzymes
5 drops Cinnamon
3 drops Nutmeg
3 drops Ginger
5 drops Sweet Orange
3 drops Roman Chamomile
2 drops Ravintsara
1 drop Frankincense

 

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